dAOuUkQTqWE

SYNOPSIS [via fair companies]

Simon Storey of Anonymous architects, wanted to buy an affordable home so he bought the smallest and cheapest thing he could find on the market. It was just 32.5 sqm within which he intended fitting both his home and office. As such, he requested special planning permission to double the height and was able to realise almost 90 sqm on a 73 sqm lot including a single car garage. The home features a largely open plan layout, with a sunken kitchen that helps to define and optimise the small space.

ARCHITECT’S DESCRIPTION

The name Eels Nest is given to very narrow lots in Japan – typically 5 meters in width (15 feet). The width of this lot is exactly that and so shares at least one interesting quality with some Japanese urban building projects.

DRAWINGS COURTESY ANONYMOUS ARCHITECTS

The existing building was originally built in 1929 on the same size lot that it sits on today – approx 73 sqm For this reason it is a very unique property. Special planning permission was required to extend the house up an additional story increasing the usable interior space by double.

The views from the roof extend as far as the Hollywood sign and the San Gabriel mountains yet the house is surrounded by dense urban development. The interior was designed to maximize the availability of daylight and the stair well is what conveys this light like a conduit.

IMAGES COURTESY ANONYMOUS ARCHITECTS

No more articles